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Stefan Herlitze

Stefan Herlitze (PI; University of Bochum)

 

Project(s) involved: Gerwert/Herlitze

 

Curriculum vitae Stefan Herlitze

Prof. Dr., 27.12.1962

Fakultät für Biologie und Biotechnologie

Lehrstuhl für Allg. Zoologie und Neurobiologie

ND 7/31

Universitätsstr. 150

44780 Bochum, Germany

Phone        +49-0234-32-24461

Email         Stefan.Herlitze@rub.de

website     http://www.ruhr-uni-bochum.de/neurobiol/

 

Education & Scientific Degrees

1983-1990         Diploma (Biology), University of Göttingen, Germany

1990-1994         PhD (Biology), University of Heidelberg with Prof. Dr. B. Sakmann, Germany

                         

Research Experience

1994-1996         Post-Doctoral Fellow, Department of Pharmacology, University of Washington, School of Medicine, Seattle, Washington, USA

1996-2000         Research Group Leader (C1), Department of Physiology, University of Tübingen, Germany

2000-2008         Assistant Professor, Department of Neurosciences, Case Western Reserve University, School of Medicine, Cleveland, Ohio, USA

2008-2009         Associate Professor, Department of Neurosciences, Case Western Reserve University, School of Medicine, Cleveland, Ohio, USA

11-2009             Professor, Department of General Zoology and Neurobiology, Ruhr-University Bochum, Bochum, Germany

                         

Honors & Awards

1990- 1994        Max-Planck-Institute Graduate Student Fellowship

1994                  Max-Planck-Institute Postdoctorate Fellowship

1994-1996         Deutsche Forschungsgemeinschaft (DFG) Postdoctorate Fellowship

1998                  Deutsche Forschungsgemeinschaft (DFG)  Scholarship for Cold Spring Harbor Course on C.elegans

1990- 1994        Max-Planck-Institute Graduate Student Fellowship

 

Selected Publications

1)     Herlitze, S., Garcia, D.E., Mackie, K., Hille, B., Scheuer, T. and Catterall, W.A. (1996) Modulation of Ca2+channels by G-protein bg subunits. Nature 380 , 258-262.

2)      Li, X., Gutierrez, D., Hanson, G., Han, J., Mark, M.D., Chiel, H., Hegemann, P., Landmesser, L.T., Herlitze, S. (2005) Fast non-invasive control of neuronal excitability and network behavior by vertebrate rhodopsin and green algae channelrhodopsin. Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci., USA, 102, 17816-21.

3)      Han, J., Mark, M.D., Waka, S., Rettig, J., Herlitze, S. (2006) RGS2 determines short-term synaptic plasticity in hippocampal neurons via regulation of Gi/o mediated presynaptic Ca2+ channel inhibition. Neuron, 51, 575-586.

4)      Armbruster, B.N., Li, X., Pausch, M.H. Herlitze, S. and Roth, B.L. (2007) Evolving the lock to fit the key: using directed molecular evolution to create a family of muscarinic acetylcholine receptors to potently activated by an inert ligand. Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci., USA, 104(12):5163-8.

5)      Liu, C., Maejima, T., Wyler, S., Casadeus, G.,  Herlitze, S. and Deneris, E.S. (2010) Pet-1 is required across different stages of life to regulate serotonergic function. Nature Neuroscience, 13(10):1190-8.

6)      Mark, M.D., Maejima, T., Kuckelsberg, D., Yoo, J.W., Hyde, R., Shah, V., Gutierrez, D., Moreno, R.L., Kruse, W., Noebels, J. and and Herlitze, S. (2011) Delayed postnatal loss of P/Q type calcium channels recapitulates the absence epilepsy, dyskinesia, and ataxia phenotypes of genomic Cacna1A mutations. J. Neuroscience, 31(11):4311-26.

7)      Masseck, O.A., Spoida, K., Dalkara, D., Maejima, T., Rubelowski, J.M., Wallhorn, L., Deneris, E.S. and Herlitze, S. (2014) Vertebrate cone opsins enable sustained and highly sensitive rapid control of Gi/o signaling in anxiety circuitry. Neuron 19(81): 1263-73.

8)      Spoida, K., Masseck, O.A., Deneris, E.S. and Herlitze, S. Gq/5-HT2c receptor signals activate a local GABAergic inhibitory feedback circuit to modulate serotonergic firing and anxiety in mice. (2014) Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci., USA, 111(17):6479-84

9)      Mark, M.D., Krause, M., Boele, H.J., Kruse, W., Pollok, S., Kuner, T., Koekkoek, S., De Zeeuw, C.I. and Herlitze, S. (2015) Spinocerebellar ataxia type 6 protein aggregates cause deficits in motor learning and cerebellar plasticity. J. Neuroscience, 5(23):8882-95.

10)    Spoida, K., Eickelbeck, D., Karapinar, R., Eckhardt, T., Mark, M.D., Jancke, D., Ehinger, B., König, P., Dalkara, D., Herlitze, S. and Masseck, O.A. (2016) Melanopsin Variants as Intrinsic Optogenetic On and Off Switches for Transient versus Sustained Activation of G Protein Pathways. Current Biology, 26(9):1206-12.